The One Year New Testament

November 14

Acts 10:1-8

Acts 10:1-8

At Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion of what was known as the Italian Cohort, a devout man who feared God with all his household, gave alms generously to the people, and prayed continually to God. About the ninth hour of the day he saw clearly in a vision an angel of God come in and say to him, “Cornelius.” And he stared at him in terror and said, “What is it, Lord?” And he said to him, “Your prayers and your alms have ascended as a memorial before God. And now send men to Joppa and bring one Simon who is called Peter. He is lodging with one Simon, a tanner, whose house is by the sea.” When the angel who spoke to him had departed, he called two of his servants and a devout soldier from among those who attended him, and having related everything to them, he sent them to Joppa.

Reflection

The story of the conversion of Cornelius is the longest narrative in the book of Acts. It is a very significant moment in the church’s progress because it shows that the gospel is for all people, not just the Jews (cf. Acts 1:8). In the gospel, God fulfills his plan for his people to be a “light for the nations” (Isa. 49:6). This happens as Jesus, the true Israel and the Light of the World, is made known to the world through the preaching of the gospel. He is the Light who shines in the darkness of this sinful world and creates new men and women from all nations who will carry this light through the gospel by the power of the Spirit to the ends of the earth.

3 John 1-4

3 John 1-4

The elder to the beloved Gaius, whom I love in truth.

Beloved, I pray that all may go well with you and that you may be in good health, as it goes well with your soul. For I rejoiced greatly when the brothers came and testified to your truth, as indeed you are walking in the truth. I have no greater joy than to hear that my children are walking in the truth.

Reflection

Once again John’s concern for the truth of the gospel (explained in his previous letters; e.g., 1 John 1:1–3; 2:21–22; 2 John 3) emerges with clarity and force in the opening verses of his letter. The word “truth” appears four times in the first four verses, highlighting the importance of faithfully preserving the gospel message in maintaining the health of Christianity (cf. 3 John 6, 9). This is why John is so passionately opposed to teaching that is false (e.g., 2 John 10–11), and why he rejoices in his spiritual “children” who are “walking in the truth” (3 John 4; cf. 2 John 4).

There is no tension between truth and grace. After all, Jesus himself came “full of grace and truth” (John 1:14). In cherishing truth and earnestly loving others, we follow in the footsteps of the Savior.

Psalm 15:1-2

Psalm 15:1-2

O Lord, who shall sojourn in your tent?
Who shall dwell on your holy hill?

He who walks blamelessly and does what is right
and speaks truth in his heart;

Thoughts For Prayer

Christians love truth, because Christians love Jesus, who is the truth (John 14:6). Pray that your love for truth would grow, and that your true understanding of God would fill your heart with love for him, his people, and the lost.

Missions Prayer Requests More

  • November 14, 2018

    Supported Workers: Mark & Patti Bean

    Countries: Peru, United States of America

    Pray for Mark & Patti as they are in a stretch of many public presentations and Sunday morning messages. In November they will be connecting with their partner churches in Wisconsin and Illinois. Pray for safety while traveling. Praise God that three of the six Bibles have been passed to SIL’s Global Publishing Services (GPS). The next step is the printers. Continue to pray for Becky as she works on the post-layout editorial check for the fourth Bible. Continue to pray for God to be glorified as He brings together the funds needed to print the remaining Bibles. Praise God that Mark is ever-so-gradually coughing less and feeling better as this six-month steroid treatment does its job.

    Scotland (Europe). There is a shortage of clergy; many current clergy are out of touch with the needs of their congregations. Nominalism is widespread, liberal theology still dominant and Freemasonry influential. Still, there are stirrings of new life through those evangelicals who remain. Pray for the Church of Scotland to return to its biblical roots and to the radical but biblically grounded faith of its early martyrs.