The Bean Family

The Bean Family

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  • Beans'talk November 2016

    Download the November 2016 Beans'talk with photos here.

    Down and back again

    In September both of us traveled down to Peru on different dates to different parts of the country. Our time in Peru overlapped.

    Leadership conference

    I (Patti) was just outside Lima helping facilitate a leadership conference. Most of the participants were Peruvians representing eight different organizations. Each one is committed to helping people access Scripture in their own language. The emphasis of the week was on personal growth, particularly spiritual growth. I learned together with everyone else. Each member of the small group I mentored left with a growth plan. We’ll be checking in together over Skype in the months ahead.

  • Beans'Talk September 2016

    Download the September 2016 Beans'Talk with photos here.

     

    Is your God my God?

    Back in 1988 we helped facilitate a music festival in the village of Margos. We wanted to encourage the use and writing of praise songs in Quechua. There was lots of participation.

    Town officials were included on the program. One warmly welcomed visitors. Included in his welcome he commended to us the time to worship God.

    In Quechua the most common way to speak about God is to say “our God.” However, instead of mentioning the time to worship “our God,” this official said, “your God.” Immediately a murmur rippled through the crowd.

    Because of the way Quechua works, that phrase essentially meant, “your God, but not my God.” So what was meant to be a welcome ended up being, at best, an embarrasment.

    That works well for Pharoah

    In Quechua when Pharoah says, “I will let you go to sacrifice to the Lord your God in the wilderness,” it is clear that God is the God of the Israelites, but not Pharoah’s God. It works for any pagan ruler to say your God.

  • Beans'talk August 2016

    What do a Bible translator and a stone mason have in common? Read our Beans'talk to find out.

    A cartoon and foto are included this month. Download the August 2016 Beans'talk here.

    Mark & Patti Bean

  • Beans'talk July 2016

    Download the July 2016 Beans'talk with photos here.

    Thank YOU!

    You’ve heard of hand-written thank yous. How about a hand-embroidered thank you? The thank you note above was presented to us the last day of April along with the handspun and woven blanket on the right.

    You who have been an integral part of the team by praying, giving and encouraging should consider your names included on this hand embroidered note. We aren’t in Peru on our own strength or resources. It takes a whole team. As the note says, “Thank you for working on God’s Word in our Quechua!”

    How long are you in the States for?

  • Beans'talk June 2016

    Download the June 2016 Beans'talk with lots of photos here.

    This is a BIG Beans'talk full of photos. We hope that doesn't prevent you from enjoying them.

    * There's a page of photos dedicated to the celebration in Peru.

    * And, there is a page dedicated to our time together with family.

    * There is also a brief third page with some praises and prayer requests

    God is good all - the - time. All the time, God - is - good!

    Mark & Patti Bean

  • Beans'talk May 2016

    Download the May Beans'talk with photos here.

    Snips of good news

    As the men all gathered for this last workshop they brought bits of good news with them.

    *Felipe and Shatu beamed when they announced that just the week before they finished recording the JESUS film for MYL Quechua speakers along with 17 other voices. We all had a part in getting the script ready. The first screening is to be sometime this summer. We’re thankful for others bringing the Good News to Quechua speakers, too.

    *Pedro left the last workshop with a stack of empty language surveys. At his church’s annual meeting of 80+ church leaders last month, they took time to go through two of the three different surveys.

  • Beans'talk April 2016

    Download the April 2016 Beans'talk with photos here.

    A woman who shows her teeth

    What if you were reading along in Proverbs and read about the “woman who shows her teeth”? From the context you’d know you should stay clear of her! But who is she?

    Quechua speakers on the Huanuco side of the state line use that phrase to describe an immoral or seductive woman. While the phrase isn’t common over here in Ancash, women often hold a hand over their mouths when they are visiting—like the woman here. She’s being modest: not showing her teeth!

    You can always find more rocks

    Shatu did a great job summing up where we find ourselves. One day he gave the following comparison. “When you prepare a field for planting,” Shatu explained, “you can always find more rocks to remove. But, if you never stop removing rocks, you’ll never plant. And if you never plant, you’ll never have a harvest. Translation is kind of like that,” he concluded. “We could keep going over these books and chapters and we’ll always find something that could be improved. But, if we don’t stop and get this out into the hands of people, what good is it?”

  • Bean Family April 2016 Prayer Requests

    1. Our LAST translation workshop meets April 12 - 29th. It starts on a Tuesday because everyone needs to be in their respective towns/villages on Sunday the 10th to vote in national elections. Goals include: work on an introduction to the Bible, select illustrations, 2 groups need to finish editing their glossary, one last discussion about which word to use for “covenant,” look at the remaining outstanding questions/issues and hopefully wrap things up. Pray against disruptions, illness and distractions. Pray for everyone to make it, for good concentration and for super attention to detail.

    2. Saturday, April 30th we've invited the men who used to work with us in translation to join us for a mini-reunion and celebration of nearly 12 years of working on these Bibles. Family members who are close enough or can travel are invited as well. Pray for a special time of honoring these men who've given so much to help translate God's word for speakers of their language.

  • Beans'Talk March 2016

    Download the March 2016 Beans'Talk with photos here.

    A couple weeks ago we were out in a nearby village teaching all weekend. It wasn’t clear if we would be coming back home to spend the night or not since it was so close. We took Mark’s extra-long sleeping bag, just in case. At my size, I’m fine with a blanket or two.

    Warm & Toasty

    Look at this stack! There are enough sheep skins and woolen blankets to sleep a large family! The closer stack is made up of home-made blankets from our hosts’ own sheep: sheared, cleaned, spun, dyed and woven by hand. Take note, ladies! This is an example of generous Quechua hospitality!

    With the sheepskins on the floor, we layered most of the blankets under us. It reminded me of the story of the Princess and the Pea. I felt like royalty being so well cared for. Unlike the princess in the story, I slept very well.

  • Beans'Talk February 2016

    Download the February 2016 Beans'Talk with photos here.

    Over and up in Huamalies

    At the time of our last letter we had no idea that we would soon take off for Huamalies—one of the language areas we translate for. One of the men on the translation team set up a weekend in the provincial capital, Llata, with church leaders from a number of towns and villages in the area. We traveled over a couple days early to avoid being on the road over New Year’s.

    Brrr….on the air

    Those first extra days there, Mark was interviewed and taught on the radio at 5:15 each morning. The down coat and woolen hat give you an idea that it was chilly! One morning during the program a man from a different town called into the station all excited about the prospect of meeting Mark in person. He traveled up with his wife and daughter to attend the events scheduled for Sunday.